12 Days of Giveaways: Day 2

UPDATE: This giveaway is now closed, but we have 10 more still to come! Here at XOXOAD, we love doing something special to usher in the holidays, and this year, we’re celebrating with 12 Days of Giveaways! Enter each day for your chance to win a different prize pack of books perfect for any reader—and we hope you get everything you wished for. Our second day of giveaways is brought to you by national bestselling author Lynn Cullen and is tailor-made for the historical fiction reader! To enter the contest, leave us a comment answering the following question: where does our modern-day idea of Santa Claus come from? Keep reading to find out the answer!


 

9781476758985Before the gift-giving, before the parties, before the peppermint sticks and feasting, there were stories.  The winter holidays wouldn’t exist without them.  Without the sacred story of Judas Maccabeus ordering yearly eight-day festivities after rededicating the Temple in Jerusalem, there would be no “Festival of Lights.”  Without the Biblical tale of Mary and Joseph finding no room at the inn, forcing the Savior of the World to be born in a humble manger, there would be no Christmas.  How less rich Christmas would be without Scrooge and Tiny Tim, without Cindy Lou Who forgiving the Grinch, without Della selling her only treasure, her hair, in order to buy a watch-chain for Jim, who has just sold his prized watch to buy a hair ornament?  Even our modern-day idea of Santa Claus comes from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature.  Without Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas,” there’d be no sleigh-riding “right jolly old elf” making midnight deliveries down chimneys.  There’d be no fake reindeer nodding in our yards—the flying sleigh pulled by reindeer was Moore’s creation, too.

Stories don’t just educate and entertain us—they bind us together.  When you give a book this holiday season, even when you read one by yourself, you are joining hands with your story-loving family—the Family of Man.  Go on, pass a book, and then pass the gravy, please.  We’re all at the table of this never-ending banquet called Life.

Read all about Clement C. Moore, “A Visit from St. Nicholas,” and other American Christmas traditions in Lynn Cullen’s novel, Mrs. Poe.  Her recently released novel, Twain’s End, has been featured in People and The New York Times.

Today’s giveaways are:

Twain’s End by Lynn Cullen

The Flying Circus by Susan Crandall

The Midwife of Venice by Roberta Rich

Summerset Abbey by T.J. Brown

Contest rules can be found here.

<< read previous read next >>
Twain’s End

Twain’s End

Lynn Cullen

From the bestselling and highly acclaimed author of the “page-turning tale” (Library Journal, starred review) Mrs. Poe comes a fictionalized imagining of the personal life of America’s most iconic writer: Mark Twain.

HEAT METER
Mrs. Poe

Mrs. Poe

Lynn Cullen

Frances Osgood finds herself embroiled in a passionate affair with the rakish--and married!--writer...but dallying with this master of horror may be more dangerous than she could ever imagine.

HEAT METER
Flying Circus

Flying Circus

Susan Crandall

From the bestselling and award-winning author of Whistling Past the Graveyard comes an adventure tale about two daredevils and a farm boy who embark on the journey of a lifetime across America's heartland in the Roaring Twenties.

HEAT METER
Midwife of Venice

Midwife of Venice

Roberta Rich

Not since Anna Diamant’s The Red Tent or Geraldine Brooks’s People of the Book has a novel transported readers so intimately into the complex lives of women centuries ago or so richly into a story of intrigue that transcends the boundaries of history. A “lavishly detailed” (Elle Canada) debut that masterfully captures sixteenth-century Venice against a dramatic and poetic tale of suspense.

HEAT METER
Summerset Abbey

Summerset Abbey

T. J. Brown

1913: In a sprawling manor on the outskirts of London, three young women seek to fulfill their destinies and desires amidst the unspoken rules of society in this stunning series starter that fans of Downton Abbey will love.

HEAT METER

MORE FROM AROUND THE WEB

152 comments so far


  1. Elizabeth Bevins

    It comes from a story told by an American Professor of Oriental Literature. Thank you for the giveaway opportunity.

  2. Our modern Santa comes from the legend of St. Nicholas (Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas”). Thanks the giveaway opportunity!

  3. from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature

  4. The Dutch figure of Sinterklaas. Great question and books!

  5. Jastothemine

    From a story! Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas” to be exact 🎅🏼

  6. The elves, Mrs Santa, and that lovable red suit guy with a white beard all jolly and all came from a poem by Clement Clarke Moore’s that creates the modern image of Santa Claus.

  7. Clement C . Moore’s “A Visit From St Nicholas.
    Thanks for the chance!!!

  8. dfosterbooks

    Our modern-day idea of Santa Claus comes from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature. – Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas.

  9. Andra Dalton

    Our modern-day story of Santa Claus comes from a poem that dates back to 1823, that was told by an American Professor of Oriental Literature Clement Clarke Moore , A Visit From St. Nicholas bettr known today as The Night Before Christmas…thanks so much for the opportunity to win & good luck to all who enter!!! Happy Holidays!!!:)

  10. Dragon_ladyjo

    The story was first told by an American professor of Orienatal literature in 1823 🎅🏼. Thanks for the giveaway!

  11. It comes from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature (Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas”). Thank you 🙂

  12. noahstclair

    It comes from an 1823 story–Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas,”

  13. Clement C. Moore and his poem created our jolly Santa Claus.

  14. from a story, first told in 1823

  15. a modern story of SANTA CLAUSE from poems dated back to 1823,THANKS

  16. SHELBYBEANIE

    I never knew It was based on Clemente C Moore Book. Learn something new everyday

  17. yahoo another great prize

  18. k.ashenfelter

    I honestly never researched the origin of Santa Claus. How interesting.
    Santa is a story first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature.

  19. redheadedjen

    Definitely from “A Visit from St. Nicholas”

  20. avidreader4fun

    Our modern-day idea of Santa Claus comes from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature- Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas,” -first brought the fictional character to life. However Santa Claus is based on St. Nicholas, born around 280 AD in what is now Turkey. Nicholas was known for helping the poor. By 1600, he was a popular saint, especially in Holland, where he was known as Sinter Klaas. By 1800, Dutch emigrants had introduced him to the United States, later helped by the writer Washington Irving passing on their stories about him, and by Clement Clarke Moore’s 1822 poem “A Visit from St. Nicholas”.

  21. From Clement C. Moore’s 1823 “A Visit from St. Nicholas”

  22. brigittenrich

    From the story, A visit from St. Nicholas, by Moore, first told in 1823.

  23. from Clement Moore with a lot of help from No-Shave November. 🙂

  24. distantlands

    The “right jolly old elf” comes from Clement C. Moore’s ” A Visit from St. Nicholas.” I read it so often to my son when he was little I had it memorized!

  25. ducktapegurl

    It comes from a story first told in 1823, by an American professor of Oriental literature.

  26. It comes from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature – Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas.”

  27. Thanks for a great giveaway opportunity! I look forward to reading Lynn Cullen’s work! The modern-day idea of Santa Claus comes from a story, first told in 1823, by Clement C. Moore titled, “A Visit from St. Nicholas.

  28. The legend of Santa Claus can be traced back hundreds of years to a monk named St. Nicholas. It is believed that Nicholas was born sometime around 280 A.D. in Patara, near Myra in modern-day Turkey. Much admired for his piety and kindness, St. Nicholas became the subject of many legends. I was curios and found this on the web.

  29. Bookworm2005

    Clement Clarke Moore’s poem

  30. vivian.bullion

    The story of Santa Claus was introduced to our modern culture in 1823 in Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas”.
    This is a great prize pack! Thanks!

  31. our modern-day idea of Santa Claus comes from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature.

  32. Our idea of Santa Claus came from Clement C. Moore’s story “A Visit from St. Nicholas”.

  33. kimbacaffeinate

    A Visit from St. Nicholas. Thanks so much for sharing and for the giveaway 🙂

  34. Our modern-day idea of Santa Claus comes from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature,Clement C. Moore.

  35. poem entitled A Visit from St. Nicholas written by Clement Moore in 1822

  36. nowischick

    From an oriental story- Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas”

  37. I have always heard Germany.

  38. “A Visit From St Nicholas.
    Which was a great story I read with my mother when I was younger.
    xo

  39. chipmu5472

    our modern-day idea of Santa Claus comes from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature.

  40. Carving Gal

    A Visit From St. Nicholas

  41. Love the fact that you’re doing these giveaways and they are so heavily weighted with great reads.

  42. BookDivaReads

    Modern Santa Claus is taken from a story published by Oriental literature professor, Clement C. Moore, in 1823.

  43. Well your answer is: our modern-day idea of Santa Claus comes from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature. but truly it comes from looking out and seeing that we are all oneheart. Seeing the light in each individual and loving still.

  44. joshcatchur

    All of these books sound so interesting!

  45. Santa Claus comes from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature. Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas,”. Thanks for the opportunity

  46. abivins688

    The story of Santa Claus was 1st told in 1823, by an American Professor of Oriental Literature. His name was Clement C. Moore who wrote “A Visit From St. Nicholas”.

    Thank you for the chance to enter your contest.
    April B.

    P.S. I love your title “XOXO After Dark”

  47. bookworm4evs

    Our modern-day idea of Santa Claus comes from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature- Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas”! I’d love to win!

  48. Initially, Santa Claus can be traced back to a 3rd century bishop by the name of St. Nicholas. However, it’s contemporary visage comes from Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas, Thomas Nast’s cartoon of St. Nick, and finally a bit of commercialism thrown in.

  49. Clement Moore’s “A Visit From St Nicholas.

  50. vintagelovingmom

    The modern-day idea of Santa Claus comes comes from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature.

  51. brendanelson

    A visit for St Nicholas

  52. From the poem by Clement C. Moore.

  53. 2readorNOT

    Our modern-day idea of Santa Claus comes from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature. – See more at: http://xoxoafterdark.com/2015/12/02/12-days-giveaways-day-2/#sthash.ZtGEn6jT.dpuf
    Thanks for the giveaways!

  54. theimaginetree

    The idea of Santa Claus came from Clement C. Moore’s story “A Visit from St. Nicholas.”

  55. Lori.macnabb@yahoo.ca

    It comes from Clement C. Moore’s A Visit from St. Nicholas.

  56. It came from a story first told in 1832 called “A Visit From St Nicholas”

  57. Alice Boni

    From the story A visit from St. Nick by Clement Moore.

  58. Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas,”

  59. ShaggyDocious

    Where does our modern-day idea of Santa Claus come from? Our modern-day idea of Santa Claus comes from Saint Nicholas of Myra who was a 4th-century Greek Christian bishop of Myra (now Demre) in Lycia, a province of the Byzantine Empire, now in Turkey. Nicholas was famous for his generous gifts to the poor. He was very religious from an early age and devoted his life entirely to Christianity.

  60. I have heard for years that it was about St Nicholas

  61. Santa Claus comes from Clement Moore’s book, A Visit From St. Nicholas. Thanks for the information, because I thought it was from Germany.

  62. Connie Fischer

    One of my favorite things about reading historical novels is that I learn so much! History, as taught in school, tends to be rather boring and dry. But, if it can be taught via historical novels, then you will have happy students.

    When I read peppermint, I smiled! That’s a huge favorite of mine.

    Thanks for this fun giveaway!

  63. It comes from a story, first told in 1823 by Clement C. Moore’s A Visit from St. Nicholas

  64. Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas

  65. Our ideas come from oral tradition, folktales, and religion.

  66. Love the season and these books sound fascinating!

  67. I thought it was Cinder Clause from a danish belief. I guess we learn something new everyday 🙂

  68. Our modern-day idea of Santa Claus comes from Clement C. Moore’s story “A Visit from St. Nicholas.”

  69. rosaliem2001

    One version of The modern day idea of Santa Claus comes from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature, Clement C. Moore’s.

  70. It came from Clement C . Moore’s “A Visit From St. Nicholas”.

  71. Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas,”

  72. Santa comes from the book A Visit From St Nicholas. Love this tale.

  73. Dates back to a time in the 1823. This is when the modern Santa first came about

  74. From Clement C. Moore’s Christmas story.

  75. Christinak

    When I think of Santa Claus I immediately think of the description in the Night Before Christmas but also I visualize modern ads especially Coca-Cola.

  76. our modern-day idea of Santa Claus comes from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature

  77. Our modern-day idea of Santa Claus comes from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature.

  78. It comes from Clement C. Moore’s story “A Visit from St. Nicholas.”

  79. Santa Claus comes from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature. Merry Christmas to all!

  80. “Even our modern-day idea of Santa Claus comes from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature.”

    <3

  81. From Clement Moore’s book for children “A Visit From St. Nicholas”

  82. Teddybear1770

    Our Santa comes from the St. Nicholas legend.

  83. The Clement Moore poem, “A Visit From St. Nicholas.”

  84. From Clement C. Moore’s A Visit From St. Nicholas

  85. AquarianDancer

    Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas.”

  86. KristineEL

    from Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nichola

  87. Clement C. Moore’s A Visit from St. Nicholas

  88. pattygangl

    Our modern-day idea of Santa Claus comes from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature.

  89. Clement c. Moore..a visit from St Nicholas.. Thank you opportunity!

  90. cldegraaff

    Our holiday traditions and stories come from a variety of ancient stories and more modern tales adapted from them.

  91. From Saint Nicholas. Who loved the poor.

  92. Ha! I want to say from the poem, but I know it isn’t. I think the gift card people really tried to promote this. Love him in all versions though.

  93. It comes from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature called “A Visit from St. Nicholas,”

  94. I like seeing the animated shows on tv with different stories but I go with the St. Nicholas legend.

  95. Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas

  96. blacksnake

    Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas”

  97. trimbert50

    The story of St.Nicholas

  98. From Clement C Moore’s story ” A Visit From St Nicholas”

  99. Clement C. Moore, an American professor of Oriental Literature.

  100. Clement Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas.”

  101. Penguins106

    It comes from Clement C Moore wrote A visit from St Nicholas in 1823 –

  102. A Visit From St. Nicholas

  103. The modern-day idea of Santa Claus comes from a story, first told in 1823, by Clement C. Moore titled, “A Visit from St. Nicholas. Thanks for a great giveaway opportunity! I look forward to reading Lynn Cullen’s work!

  104. It came from a story told by an American professor of Oriental literature.

  105. came from a poem by Clement Clarke Moore’s that creates the modern image of Santa Claus. great contest

  106. from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature –

  107. From a book written by Clement C. Moore called, “A Visit From St. Nicholas”

  108. Clement C Moore

  109. torresmom3

    Our idea of Santa comes from the legend of St. Nicholas.

  110. Clement Moore’s book “A visit from St. Nicholas”

  111. karenmrinn@aol.com

    my parents started us early on the books as gifts idea. Every Christmas we would get something to read, something to wear, something to save, and something to play with. We could also stay up later if we were reading. I shared this love of reading with my kids, and hopefully they will do the same when the time comes!

  112. Vihousgirl

    The modern-day idea of Santa Claus comes from a story by an American professor of Oriental literature, Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas.

  113. St. Nicholas was the inspiration for Santa Claus as we know it.

  114. Our Santa Claus ideal comes from Clement C. Moore’s short story! Thanks so much for the chance! Happy Holidays!

  115. Texas Book Lover

    Our modern day idea of Santa Claus comes from Clement C. Moore’s story, A Visit from St. Nicholas. first told in 1823.

  116. sunshinehdfan

    From a story first told in1823

  117. Our modern day santa comes from Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas,”

  118. Gebhardt53

    Our modern-day idea of Santa Claus comes from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature.

  119. Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas,”

  120. Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas,

  121. If the following historical texts are to be believed, Saint Nicholas, or Santa Claus of Modern day is rooted in the Dutch and german folk lore of our early settlers.

    [quote]St Nicholas Center Collection
    Widely celebrated in Europe, St. Nicholas’ feast day, December 6th, kept alive the stories of his goodness and generosity. In Germany and Poland, boys dressed as bishops begged alms for the poor—and sometimes for themselves! In the Netherlands and Belgium, St. Nicholas arrived on a steamship from Spain to ride a white horse on his gift-giving rounds. December 6th is still the main day for gift giving and merrymaking in much of Europe. For example, in the Netherlands St. Nicholas’ Day is celebrated with the sharing of candies (thrown in the door), chocolate initial letters, small gifts, and riddles. Dutch children leave carrots and hay in their shoes for the horse, hoping St. Nicholas will exchange them for small gifts. Simple gift-giving in early Advent helps preserve a Christmas Day focus on the Christ Child.
    Saint Nicholas and the Origin of Santa Claus print version
    Bishop St. Nicholas, early American St. Nick, & American Santa, from Santa Claus Comes to America, by Caroline Singer & Cyrus Baldridge, Alfred Knopf, 1942.
    How did the kindly Christian saint, good Bishop Nicholas, become a roly-poly red-suited American symbol for merry holiday festivity and commercial activity?
    The first Europeans to arrive in the New World brought St. Nicholas. Vikings dedicated their cathedral to him in Greenland. On his first voyage, Columbus named a Haitian port for St. Nicholas on December 6, 1492. In Florida, Spaniards named an early settlement St. Nicholas Ferry, now known as Jacksonville. However, St. Nicholas had a difficult time during the 16th century Protestant Reformation which took a dim view of saints. Even though both reformers and counter-reformers tried to stamp out St. Nicholas-related customs, they had very little long-term success; only in England were the religious folk traditions of Christmas permanently altered. (It is ironic that fervent Puritan Christians began what turned into a trend to a more secular Christmas observance.) Because the common people so loved St. Nicholas, he survived on the European continent as people continued to place nuts, apples, and sweets in shoes left beside beds, on windowsills, or before the hearth.
    “New Year’s Hymn to St. Nicholas,” colonial Dutch life, Albany, NY. Harper’s New Monthly Magazine, March 1881.
    St. Nicholas Center Collection
    Colonists came to America after the Reformation in the 1500s. They were primarily Puritans and other Protestant reformers who did not bring Nicholas traditions to the New World. What about the Dutch? Although it is nearly universally reported that the Dutch did bring St. Nicholas to New Amsterdam, scholars find limited evidence of such traditions in Dutch New Netherland Colonial Germans in Pennsylvania held the feast of St. Nicholas, and several accounts do have St. Nicholas visiting New York Dutch on New Years’ Eve. Patriots formed the Sons of St. Nicholas in 1773, not to honor Bishop Nicholas, but rather as a non-British symbol to counter the English St. George societies. This St. Nicholas society was similar to the Sons of St. Tammany in Philadelphia. Not exactly St. Nicholas, the children’s gift-giver.
    Detail from First Celebration of the Festival of St. Nicholas by The New-York Historical Society, Broadside by Alexander Anderson, December 6, 1810, commissioned by John Pintard, SY 1864-21, negative number 28883.
    After the American Revolution, New Yorkers remembered with pride the colony’s nearly-forgotten Dutch roots. John Pintard, influential patriot and antiquarian, who founded the New York Historical Society in 1804, promoted St. Nicholas as patron saint of both society and city. In January 1809, Washington Irving joined the society and on St. Nicholas Day that year he published the satirical Knickerbocker’s History of New York, which made numerous references to a jolly St. Nicholas character. This was not a saintly bishop, rather an elfin Dutch burgher with a clay pipe. These delightful flights of imagination are the origin of the New Amsterdam St. Nicholas legends: that the first Dutch emigrant ship had a figurehead of St. Nicholas; that St. Nicholas Day was observed in the colony; that the first church was dedicated to him: and that St. Nicholas comes down chimneys to bring gifts. Irving’s work was regarded as the “first notable work of imagination in the New World.”
    The New York Historical Society held its first St. Nicholas anniversary dinner on December 6, 1810. John Pintard commissioned artist Alexander Anderson to create the first American image of Nicholas for the occasion. Nicholas was shown in a gift-giving role with children’s treats in stockings hanging at a fireplace. The accompanying poem ends, “Saint Nicholas, my dear good friend! To serve you ever was my end, If you will, now, me something give, I’ll serve you ever while I live.”
    The jolly elf image received a big boost in 1823, from a poem destined to become immensely popular, “A Visit from St. Nicholas,” now better known as “The Night Before Christmas.”
    His looks are changing, but it is still Saint Nicholas
    Period Postcard

    He was dressed all in fur, from his head to his foot,
    And his clothes were all tarnished with ashes and soot;
    A bundle of toys he had flung on his back,
    And he looked like a peddler just opening his pack.

    His eyes—how they twinkled! his dimples how merry!
    His cheeks were like roses, his nose like a cherry!
    His droll little mouth was drawn up like a bow,
    And the beard of his chin was as white as the snow;

    The stump of a pipe he held tight in his teeth,
    And the smoke it encircled his head like a wreath;
    He had a broad face and a little round belly,
    That shook, when he laughed like a bowlful of jelly.
    He was chubby and plump, a right jolly old elf. . . .

    Saint Nicholas 1849 engraving by Boyd
    Washington Irving’s St. Nicholas strongly influenced the poem’s portrayal of a round, pipe-smoking, elf-like St. Nicholas. The poem generally has been attributed to Clement Clark Moore, a professor of biblical languages at New York’s Episcopal General Theological Seminary. However, a case has been made by Don Foster in Author Unknown, that Henry Livingston actually penned it in 1807 or 1808. Livingston was a farmer/patriot who wrote humorous verse for children. In any case, “A Visit from St. Nicholas” became a defining American holiday classic. No matter who was the author, it has had an enormous influence on the American transformation of St. Nicholas.
    “Merry Old Santa Claus,” by Thomas Nast, Harper’s Weekly, January 1, 1881.
    Other artists and writers continued the change to an elf-like St. Nicholas, “Sancte Claus,” or “Santa Claus,” unlike the stately European bishop. In 1863, political cartoonist Thomas Nast began a series of annual drawings in Harper’s Weekly which were based on the descriptions found in the poem and Washington Irving’s work. These drawings established a rotund Santa with flowing beard, fur garments, and an omnipresent clay pipe. As Nast drew Santas until 1886, his work had considerable influence in forming the American Santa Claus. Along with changes in appearance, the saint’s name changed to Santa Claus as a natural phonetic alteration from the German Sankt Niklaus and Dutch Sinterklaas.
    Coca-Cola Santa by Haddon Sundblom Courtesy of the Coca-Cola Company
    Dozens of artists portrayed Santa in a wide range of styles, sizes, and colors, including Norman Rockwell on Saturday Evening Post covers. But it was in the 1930s that the now-familiar American Santa image solidified. Haddon Sundblom began thirty-five years of Coca-Cola Santa advertisements which finally established Santa as an icon of contemporary commercial culture. This Santa was life-sized, jolly, and wearing the now familiar red suit. He appeared in magazines, on billboards, and shop counters encouraging Americans to see Coke as the solution to “a thirst for all seasons.” By the 1950s Santa was turning up everywhere as a benign source of beneficence. This commercial success has led to the North American Santa Claus being exported around the world where he threatens to overcome the European St. Nicholas, who has retained his identity as a Christian bishop and saint.
    Nast Santa, Bishop Nicholas, Coke Santa, illustration by Renee Graef, A Special Place for Santa Roman, Inc., 1991. Permission pending.
    It’s been a long journey from the Fourth Century Bishop of Myra, St. Nicholas, who showed his devotion to God in extraordinary kindness and generosity, to America’s jolly Santa Claus. However, if you peel back the accretions he is still Nicholas, Bishop of Myra, whose caring surprises continue to model true giving and faithfulness. In the United States there is growing interest in the original saint to help recover the spiritual dimension of this festive time. For indeed, St. Nicholas, lover of the poor and patron saint of children, is a model of how Christians are meant to live. A priest, a bishop, Nicholas put Jesus Christ at the center of his life, his ministry, his entire existence. Families, churches, and schools are embracing true St Nicholas traditions as one way to claim the true center of Christmas—the birth of Jesus. Such a focus helps restore balance to increasingly materialistic and stress-filled Advent and Christmas seasons.
    Sources:
    The New-York Historical Society Quarterly, Volume XXXVIII Number 4, October 1954, “Knickerbocker Santa Claus” by Charles W. Jones
    The Encyclopedia of New York State, Sample Entries, “Saint Nicholas” by Peter R. Christoph
    Were They Wise Men or Kings, Joseph J. Walsh, Westminster John Knox, 2001
    “A Glimpse of an Old Dutch Town,” Harper’s New Monthly Magazine, Harper and Brothers, New York, Vol. 62, Number 370, March 1881.
    Book review by Howard Hageman: Charles W. Jones’s, Saint Nicholas of Myra, Bari, and Manhattan: Biography of a Legend, in Theology Today, October 1979.[/quote]

  122. rsbrandt44

    From Clement Moore…and from Coca-Cola advertisements.

  123. from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature. Without Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas,” there’d be no sleigh-riding “right jolly old elf” making midnight deliveries down chimneys. There’d be no fake reindeer nodding in our yards—the flying sleigh pulled by reindeer was Moore’s creation, too. – See more at: http://xoxoafterdark.com/2015/12/02/12-days-giveaways-day-2/#sthash.VEqnDAjN.dpuf

  124. Our modern day Santa comes from the story by Clement Clark Moore.

  125. Clement C. Moore’s book “A Visit from St. Nicholas”

  126. From Clement C. Moore’s 1823 “A Visit from St. Nicholas”

  127. Diane Sallans

    I’ve heard a variety of Santa origin stories – they all bring their own twist to the legend.

  128. It came from a story. Informative blog. Happy holidays!!

  129. momof3boysj

    Even our modern-day idea of Santa Claus comes from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature. Without Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas,” there’d be no sleigh-riding “right jolly old elf” making midnight deliveries down chimneys. There’d be no fake reindeer nodding in our yards—the flying sleigh pulled by reindeer was Moore’s creation, too. – See more at: http://xoxoafterdark.com/2015/12/02/12-days-giveaways-day-2/#sthash.av90aZ46.dpuf

  130. Our modern-day idea of Santa Claus comes from a story, 1st told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature… Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas”

  131. stephcullers@gmail.com

    We can can thank St. Nicholas for taking the best of generosity and altruism in helping others to inspire Sinter Klaas, Kris Kringle, Father Christmas, and our own much beloved Santa Claus.

  132. LPWillingham

    Our modern idea of Santa Claus comes from Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas.”

  133. From Clement C. Moore’s 1823 “A Visit from St. Nicholas”

  134. NormaStar5

    Our Modern Day Santa Claus comes from Saint Nicholas who was known for secret gift-giving of coins into shoes for the poor. He is patron saint of children. But, also, he provided a dowry for young women so they could be married – this was good for those poor families that had no way of providing for their daughters to bring something into the marriage. The image of Santa Claus has changed some giving him a wife and elves. His modern name comes from the Dutch – Sinterklass – Santa Claus.
    I hope I got this right – great fun!

  135. Our modern-day idea of Santa Claus comes from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature. From Clement Moore’s book for children “A Visit From St. Nicholas”
    Thank you for the great giveaway.

  136. fangswandsfairy

    “Story” is one of the things that make us human. Our bodies evolved for communication with each other.

  137. We get our modern day Santa Claus from Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas.”

  138. from the twas the night before story by Moore

  139. midnightallie

    From Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas” – a classic

  140. From St. Nicholas

  141. love_tea78

    Froma story A Visit from St. Nicholas

  142. From Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas.”

  143. From St Nicholas who died December 6the in the year 343AD

  144. Even our modern-day idea of Santa Claus comes from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature. Without Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas,” there’d be no sleigh-riding “right jolly old elf” making midnight deliveries down chimneys. – See more at: http://xoxoafterdark.com/2015/12/02/12-days-giveaways-day-2/#comments

  145. Even our modern-day idea of Santa Claus comes from a story, first told in 1823 by an American professor of Oriental literature. Without Clement C. Moore’s “A Visit from St. Nicholas,” there’d be no sleigh-riding “right jolly old elf” making midnight deliveries down chimneys.

  146. It comes from a story in 1823 from a Professor of Oriental Literature. Clement C. Moore’s A Visit From St. Nichola. Thank you for the giveaway chance.
    Carol L
    Lucky4750 (at) aol (dot) com

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